[Five Minute Friday] Mess

Imagine a glass or a porcelain cup.
Beautiful shape, maybe some carvings on the outside.
Smooth surface and precious material.
It’s really great to touch or use.

But something is missing.
There is no light in this cup.

If you’d put a candle in the glass you wouldn’t see much through the perfectly firm surface. No matter how beautiful the outside looks, it doesn’t reflect the inside.

Imagine this glass or cup falling off the table.
Shattering into thousands of little pieces.
Beauty spread across the floor, into corners, turned into dust.

But do you see the hand that gathers the pieces?
The eyes that carefully search for even the last piece, no matter how far it has fallen?
Do you feel the touch of the master who gently puts the pieces back together?

35979-img_5650

Look at the glass now.
Imagine the cup being pieced together again.
Its smooth surface is gone, its material looks roughened.
Its original beauty has been replaced by magnificent splendor, coming from the inside.
The light that has been kept inside for so long is now reflected and magnified through the cracks and bruises.

Through the hands of the master a mess can become a canvas to reflect something greater inside.
Do we allow the master to use OUR mess as a canvas to reflect HIS beauty?

—————————————————————————————
One word. Five minutes of writing. No editing. Sharing with a community of lovely writing fellows. That’s Five Minute Friday with Lisa-Jo Baker!

[Lost and Refound] Give – and Give Generously! /Gib – und gib großzügig!

This post might be mostly a message to myself, but maybe also to a few others in my generation. I also don’t intend to preach morals here; I rather want to stir up a discussion about an issue I’m dealing with and would love to hear other people’s insight on this!

People in Western countries today have more money at hand than ever before: in bank accounts, in investments, in savings, in large amounts they can spend everyday in shops or online.

Yet, I feel that people in Western countries today spend less money for and in the kingdom of God than ever before. I cannot give any statistics or exact numbers, so I might be totally off with this assumption.
But when I observe my own way of handling money or talk to a few others (as well as the almost absence of this topic from church teaching)  I feel we don’t necessarily link up our money and God’s perspective on that.

Here are some questions and issues I tend to struggle with…

What does God say about handling and giving money?
“Every man shall give as he is able, according to the blessing of the Lord your God that he has given you.” (Deuteronomy 16:17)

It seems the riches and blessings we’ve been given are not just meant for ourselves. Even though we work and earn money, everything we own is still a gift of God. And this gift has to be handled carefully. We should appreciate it (and its giver) by sharing our blessing with others. This also includes our money.

“Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have, for such sacrifices are pleasing to God.” (Hebrew 13:16)

Sharing is not always easy. It might even be a sacrifice. But we can be sure that it is not in vain. It is so easy to cling to money, even though it cannot really offer us any security. By giving it up and sharing it with others we might also make a statement about who we actually put our trust in. 

So why don’t we give more?
I think the tricky part about many of God’s promises is to actually stand on them, to apply them to our own realities, to turn them into practice. The reality is a fixed figure in our bank account, the amount of bills and coins we have in our wallets, the list of regular expenses per month. 
That’s when I realize that my faith reality is often marked by a great lack of trust. No more bold song lyrics or pieces of advice. Just the simple realization: I don’t trust you with my money, God. If I give I might not have enough for myself. If I share I might end up losing.  
There might be other reasons like not knowing where exactly you should give your money to, drowning in a sea of opportunities. Or doubting that your money will be used for a good purpose. 

I love the way God refutes our hesitations, questions and doubts:

“Bring the full tithe into the storehouse, that there may be food in my house. And thereby put me to the test, says the Lord of hosts, if I will not open the windows of heaven for you and pour down for you a blessing until there is no more need.” (Malachi 3:10)

The ten percent we give up for God’s kingdom and his purposes will always be rewarded. Our willingness to give will not result in lack or need. 

But what happens when we give? 
In human terms, giving away means having less. Spending means losing. Well, this is not how God works. His principles seem to contradict our often so set ideas:

“One gives freely, yet grows all the richer;
    
another withholds what he should give, and only suffers want.
Whoever brings blessing will be enriched,
    
and one who waters will himself be watered.” (Proverbs 11:24&25)

There is the story of the poor widow who gives just a few pennies (Mark 12). And yet God values her gift so much more than the rich people who might not even realize their money is gone. I don’t think God cares so much about the exact amount we put in the offering box. He is after our heart and our attitude while we give. Are we ready to let go of certain things and experience a change of heart in return? 

This is the mystery of faith: Everything you invest will be given back to you in amounts you can never possibly imagine. I am not saying you’ll be trouble free. I am not saying we’ll all be millionaires. But the water you give will come back to you in streams of life, grace, and blessings. Withholding equals want, but giving freely will lead to a richness only the giver of all riches can provide.

Now this was/is me rambling…What are your thoughts on this? How do you handle your money? Do you invest financially into the kingdom? How has God blessed you through this? Would love to hear from you!


Dieser Post ist vielleicht nur eine Botschaft an mich, aber vielleicht trifft sie ja auch ein paar andere in meiner Generation. Ich möchte auch keine Moral hier predigen; es geht eher darum, eine Diskussion anzustoßen über ein Thema, das mich beschäftigt und bei dem ich gerne die Meinung anderer hören würde!

Leute in westlichen Ländern haben heute mehr Geld zur Verfügung als jemals zuvor: auf Bankkonten, in Investitionen, auf Sparbüchern, in großen Summen, die sie jeden Tag beim Einkaufen oder Online ausgeben. 

Trotzdem kommt es mir so vor, dass Leute in westlichen Ländern heute weniger Geld für und ins Reich Gottes investieren als jemals zuvor. Ich kann euch keine Statistiken oder genaue Zahlen dazu bieten, deswegen liege ich vielleicht auch völlig daneben mit meiner Annahme. Aber wenn ich mich selbst beobachte, wie ich mit Geld umgehe oder mit anderen darüber rede (oder die fast Abwesenheit dieses Themas in Predigten) denke ich, dass wir nicht unbedingt unser Geld mit der Perspektive Gottes darauf verbinden. 

Hier sind also einige Fragen und Probleme, mit denen ich normalerweise kämpfe…

Was sagt Gott über Geld und Geld geben?
“Aber niemand soll mit leeren Händen vor demHerrn erscheinen, sondern jeder mit dem, was er geben kann, je nach dem Segen, den der Herr, dein Gott, dir gegeben hat.” (5.Mose 16:17)

Es scheint, als ob der Reichtum und Segen, der uns gegeben wurde, nicht nur für uns bestimmt ist. Obwohl wir arbeiten und Geld verdienen, ist alles, was wir haben, immer noch ein Geschenk Gottes. Und dieses Geschenk muss man kostbar behandeln. Wir sollten es wertschätzen (und seinen Geber), indem wir unseren Segen mit anderen teilen. Das gilt auch für unser Geld.
Wohlzutun und mitzuteilen vergesst nicht; denn solche Opfer gefallen Gott wohl!” (Hebräer 13:16)
Teilen ist nicht immer einfach. Es kann auch Opfer erfordern. Aber wir können sicher sein, dass es nicht umsonst ist. Man hängt sich so leicht an Geld, auch wenn es uns eigentlich gar keine Sicherheit bieten kann. Wenn wir es aufgeben und mit anderen teilen, machen wir vielleicht gleichzeitig auch eine Aussage darüber, wem wir wirklich vertrauen. 
Warum geben wir also nicht mehr?
Ich glaube, das Schwierige an Gottes Verheißungen ist, sich wirklich darauf zu stellen, sie auf unsere Wirklichkeit anzuwenden, sie in die Praxis umzusetzen. Die Realität ist ein bestimmter Betrag auf unserem Bankkonto, die vielen Scheine und Münzen in unserem Geldbeutel, die Liste an regelmäßigen Ausgaben im Monat. 
Immer dann merke ich, dass meine Glaubensrealität von Glaubensmangel bestimmt ist. Keine mutigen Songtexte mehr oder Ratschläge. Nur die einfache Erkenntnis: Ich vertraue dir beim Geld nicht, Gott. Wenn ich etwas gebe, habe ich selbst nicht genug. Wenn ich teile, habe ich am Ende zu wenig. 
Es könnte noch andere Gründe geben, wie etwa nicht zu wissen, wo genau man sein Geld hingeben sollte, da man in der Flut der Möglichkeiten ertrinkt. Oder der Zweifel, ob das Geld auch wirklich gut genutzt werden wird.
Ich liebe die Art, wie Gott unsere Zurückhaltung, Fragen und Zweifel ausräumt:
“Bringt den Zehnten ganz in das Vorratshaus, damit Speise in meinem Haus sei, und prüft mich doch dadurch, spricht der Herrder Heerscharen, ob ich euch nicht die Fenster des Himmels öffnen und euch Segen in überreicher Fülle herabschütten werde!” (Maleachi 3:10)
Die zehn Prozent, die wir für Gottes Reich und seine Zwecke geben, werden immer belohnt werden. Unsere Bereitschaft zu geben, wird nicht im Mangel oder Not enden. 
Was passiert, wenn wir geben?
Menschlich gedacht bedeutet geben, dass man am Ende weniger hat. Ausgeben heißt verlieren. Tja, aber so arbeitet Gott nicht. Seine Prinzipien scheinen unseren festen Ideen so oft zu widersprechen:

“Einer teilt aus und wird doch reicher;ein anderer spart mehr, als recht ist, und wird nur ärmer.Eine segnende Seele wird reichlich gesättigt,
und wer anderen zu trinken gibt, wird selbst erquickt.” (Sprüche 11:24&25)

In Markus 12 gibt es die Geschichte der armen Witwe, die nur ein paar Pfennige gibt. Aber Gott schätzt ihre Gabe so viel mehr als die der Reichen, die vielleicht gar nicht merken, dass ihr Geld weg ist. Ich glaube, Gott geht es gar nicht wirklich um den exakten Betrag im Opferbeutel. Er will unser Herz und die Einstellung, wenn wir geben. Sind wir bereit, bestimmte Dinge loszulassen und dabei zu erleben, wie er unser Herz verändert?

Das ist das Geheimnis des Glaubens: Alles, was du investiert, wird dir in Summen zurückgegeben, die du dir nie hättest vorstellen können. Ich sage nicht, dass alle deine Probleme gelöst sein werden. Ich sage nicht, dass wir alle Millionäre sein werden. Aber das Wasser, das du gibst, wird zu dir zurückkommen in Strömen des Lebens, der Gnade und des Segens. Zurückkalten führt zu Wollen, aber freies Geben wird zu einem Reichtum führen, den nur der Geber aller Dinge geben kann.

Das waren/sind meine Gedanken…Was denkst du darüber? Wie gehst du mit deinem Geld um? Investiert du finanziell in das Reich Gottes? Wie hat Gott dich darin gesegnet? Ich freu mich, von dir zu hören!


[Five Minute Friday] Visit

Ever since the travel bug got to me many years ago, I have an urge to travel. To see new places, experience the smell of other countries, the rhythm of a new city, the breath taking scenery of a new landscape.

But more than that I want to visit people.
To see the way they live, eat at their favorite restaurant, dance to their favorite tune, take a tour at night around their favorite places in town.
To sit for hours and hours, with not much more than a cup of coffee, just talking about the ups and downs of life.
Sharing lives and sharing hearts.

I’ve had a few of such visits, and most of them were unplanned. No month-long planning, no detailed schedule. Just a bit of time. If you give time to a person, you are always in for a treat full of blessings. Always.

And yet, I am still here. Alone. What’s holding me back?
Well, there’s distance. Many dear friends live everywhere but close. A visit would take one or more plane rides. And a bit of a vacation.
And there’s money.

But, honestly, most of the time, it is plain laziness.
Or busyness. Or a lack of trust. Call it what you want.
Sometimes I discover myself not trusting a friendship enough.
Not trusting a surprise visit would be appreciated.
Not trusting I would be thrilled to see a friend simply showing up and “messing” with my packed schedule.
Not trusting that we should be just as fine seeing each other instead of typing our lives and thoughts.
Or not trusting I will finish the work load in front of me if I take a weekend off to spend with a friend.

Well, away with these thoughts!
Here’s to a bit more trust.
A bit more spontaneity and less planning.
A bit more friendship.
And hopefully, a bit (or a lot!) more visiting.

——————————————————————————-
How about visiting Lisa Jo Baker‘s blog for more interesting thoughts?

The small things that matter/Auf die kleinen Dinge kommt es an

Even though it’s already mid-January I want to post some memories of an event that took place over New Year’s: Mission-Net.
Coming out of a Europe-wide youth movement this bi-annual congress seeks to bring together young people from all across Europe – to teach, inspire and equip them to live a missional lifestyle.

I only knew bits and pieces when I got involved in the planning team in January 2013; by the end of the year I was part of the leadership, running a congress for 2800 people. It was definitely a challenge, but also an adventure and an immense blessing!

I could tell stories of great music and worship, inspiring messages by great speakers from all over the world, seminars on all kinds of topics, about 50 different languages and dialects floating around the Messe compound of Offenburg.
Yet, when I look back at these seven days of congress (as well as the year of preparation going into it) there is a lot of little things I learned to appreciate, still marvel at, and most of all am incredibly grateful for. So here’s my take on Mission-Net 2013/14.

Don’t ever underestimate yourself. 
I had never organized something this big, and I also probably never had that much responsibility. I could bring a few things to the table, but I discovered so much more about myself! This challenge taught me so much about organization, coordination and communication as well as team leadership – and I must say I kind of like it (even though it might also be that one Germanness I have inside of me :))!
Nevertheless, it was also a process of getting to know myself, including my limits. It takes courage and wisdom to know where to get involved, when to shut off the computer, or when to step back from a job. This is definitely a life-long learning experience, but challenges are a good place to start learning.

Make it a habit to trust others.
As just said, I was (and still am) a newbie to this, and yet I was trusted with so much. I am so glad for the other leaders who trusted me, challenged me, encouraged me along the way, pushed me forward – and it lead to growth and blessing! We will never learn by just sitting in the closet; sometimes we need to leave the nest and test how far we can fly. Or we need to be the ones who “push” others out of the nest and encourage their first attempts at flying. I experienced both these situations; I was surely blessed by my own “flights”, but maybe even more by watching others soar and fly.

Teamwork truly is a gift. 
Most of the planning was done virtually, since the leadership as well as all other volunteers were spread all across Europe. Countless emails went back and forth, mostly with people I had never met before. Slowly by slowly, relationships developed, hidden between the lines of administrative emails. So I was even more excited to finally meet these people, finally putting faces and names together.
I guess it is rather curious to see that the only time we actually met was under stress, in the midst of a crazy schedule, with countless of requests and jobs pending. All of us had a lack of sleep, had been running around for many hours already – yet, there was not a single incident of snapping, impatience, or serious misunderstanding (which could have easily happened under such circumstances, with such a diversity of characters and personality profiles).
Instead I met the most incredible people, with great expertise on their topics, a fun personality and such an inspiring passion for people, prayer and God’s vision for this world. This was and is grace, some of them have become friends and I hope we stay in touch!

Be an encourager. 
Preparation involved writing a lot of emails, asking questions, making suggestions, bringing ideas together, organizing schedules and teams. This could be stressful at times.
Most of the congress I was running around between the different halls, solving practical problems, answering people’s questions or making requests happen. This cost me a lot of physical as well as mental energy, I was exhausted at the end of every day and yet could not sleep at night.
I am so grateful for every little joke in the emails making me smile in the midst of confusing coordination; for everyone who stopped me in my run to ask how I am doing; for every hug or smile along the way; for every prayer – these things carried me through and I could not have been that awake and energetic without you! In the midst of great messages on stage I guess it’s these little encouragements I take away from the congress.

We are part of something bigger.
One of the memorable things from this congress might have been NewYear’s Eve. We had a prayer night with the message: There is hope for Europe! Hundreds of young people interceded for their continent and all the people that God loves and wants to have close to him. And then we celebrated, as one continent, as a young generation ready to love and serve, as a European family.
So, I guess there is hope for this world – if we are ready to be used by the one who is and gives hope. And I am excited to see where these 2800 people will go, serve and bring a bit of that change they have experienced in their own lives!

Obwohl es schon Mitte Januar ist, möchte ich noch etwas posten von dem, was über Silvester stattgefunden hat: Mission-Net. Als Teil einer Europaweiten Bewegung will dieser Kongress junge Leute aus ganz Europe zusammenbringen- um sie zu lehren, zu inspirieren und auszurüsten für einen missionarischen Lebensstil. 
Ich wusste nur wenig, als ich ins Planungsteam eingestiegen bin im Januar 2013; am Ende des Jahres war ich in der Leitung und habe einen Kongress für 2800 Leute organisiert. Es war definitiv eine Herausforderung, aber auch ein Abenteuer und ein ungemeiner Segen!

Ich könnte Geschichten erzählen von guter Musik und Lobpreis, von guten Predigten von super Rednern aus aller Welt, Seminaren zu allen möglichen Themen oder den ca. 50 Sprachen auf dem Messegelände. 
Aber wenn ich auf diese sieben Tage Kongress (und das Jahr an Vorbereitung) zurückschaue, gibt es viele kleine Dinge, die ich schätzen gelernt habe, die mich immer noch begeistern und über die ich unendlich dankbar bin. Hier ist also meine Rückschau auf Mission-Net 2013/14.

Unterschätz dich nicht.
Ich habe noch nie so etwas großes organisiert und hatte noch nie so viel Verantwortung. Ein paar Sachen konnte ich mitbringen, aber ich habe noch so viel mehr über mich herausgefunden! Diese Herausforderung hat mich so viel gelehrt über Organisation, Koordination, Kommunikation und Teamleitung- und ich muss sagen, mir hat es Spaß gemacht (vielleicht ist das aber auch das bisschen Deutschsein in mir:))!
Ich habe aber auch mich selbst kennengelernt, auch meine Grenzen. Man braucht Mut und Weisheit zu wissen, wo man einsteigt, wann man den Computer ausmacht, oder wo man sich raushalten sollte. Das ist sicher ein lebenslanger Prozess, aber diese Herausforderung war ein guter Ort, mit dem Lernen anzufangen. 

Lerne, anderen zu vertrauen. 
Ich war (und bin wohl immer noch) ein Anfänger bei all diesen Dingen, und trotzdem wurde mir viel zugetraut. Ich bin den Leitern sehr dankbar, dass sie mir etwas zugetraut haben, mich herausgefordert haben, mich ermutigt haben- es hat zu Wachstum und Segen geführt! Wenn wir nur in einer Kammer sitzen, lernen wir nicht viel; wir müssen auch mal das Nest verlassen und testen, wie weit wir fliegen können. Oder aber wir müssen andere aus dem Nest “stoßen” und ihre ersten Versuche zu fliegen unterstützen. Ich habe beides erlebt und wurde durch meine ersten “Flüge” gesegnet, aber wohl noch noch mehr, wenn ich andere fliegen habe sehen. 

Teamarbeit ist ein Geschenk.
Die meiste Planung geschah virtuell, da die Leitung überall in Europa verstreut war. Viele Emails gingen hin und her, die meisten Leute kannte ich nicht. Langsam entwickelte sich eine Beziehung, versteckt zwischen den Zeilen der Planungsmails. Also habe ich mich umso mehr darauf gefreut, die Leute kennenzulernen, endlich Namen und Gesicht zusammenzubringen. 
Eigentlich ist es interessant, dass die einzige Zeit, wo wir uns gesehen haben, unter Stress war, inmitten krassen Zeitplänen und Anfragen. Alle hatten Schlafmangel, waren viele Stunden herumgerannt – trotzdem gab es keinen einzigen Vorfall, wo einer schnippisch, ungeduldig oder verwirrt war (was total normal gewesen wäre unter solchen Umständen, bei so vielen Charakteren und Persönlichkeiten). 
Stattdessen habe ich unfassbar tolle Menschen getroffen, mit viel Wissen, einer tollen Persönlichkeit und einer Leidenschaft für Menschen, Gebet und Gottes Vision für diese Welt. Das war und ist Gnade, manche sind Freunde geworden und hoffentlich bleiben wir in Kontakt!

Sei ein Ermutiger. 
Im Vorfeld habe ich viele Emails geschrieben, Fragen gestellt, Vorschläge gemacht, Ideen zusammengebracht, Teams und Zeitpläne organisiert. Das war manchmal stressig.
Während des Kongresses rannte ich zwischen den Räumen hin-und her, habe praktische Probleme gelöst, Fragen beantwortet…Das hat körperliche und geistige Energie gekostet, ich war am Ende jedes Tages erledigt und konnte doch nicht schlafen. 
Deswegen bin ich umso dankbarer für jeden kleinen Witz in einer Email, der mich zum Schmunzeln brachte; für jeden, der mich stoppte um zu sehen, ob es mir gutgeht, der nachfragte; für jede Umarmung und Lachen; für jedes Gebet – das hat mich durchgetragen und ich hätte nicht so wach und energiereich sein können ohne euch! Trotz der guten Predigten von der Bühne sind es wohl diese kleinen Ermutigungen, die ich von diesem Kongress mitnehme. 

Wir sind Teil von etwas Größerem.
Eins der eindrücklichen Dinge war wohl Silvester. Die Bostschaft war: Es gibt Hoffnung für Europa! Hunderte von jungen Leute standen für ihren Kontinent und all die Menschen, die Gott liebt, ein. Und dann wurde gefeiert, als ein Kontinent, als eine junge Generation, die lieben und dienen will. Als eine europäische Familie.
Es gibt also noch Hoffnung für diese Welt – wenn wir uns gebrauchen lassen von dem, der Hoffnung is und gibt. Und ich bin, wo diese 2800 Leute hingehen werden, um zu dienen und ein bisschen von dieser Veränderung zu leben, die sie selbst erlebt haben!